Tag Archives: BAFTA Cymru

BAFTAS the Welsh way, a personal response by Helen Joy

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I leave St David’s Hall, feet hurting & makeup failing, holding a paper napkin full of warm quiche and Welsh rarebit. Outside, sitting cross-legged on the floor with his back against a wall is a homeless man with a lap full of BAFTA chocolates, still in their fancy boxes. Would you like something savoury? Ooh, yes please. Here, enjoy.

What is it about us that believes there is a difference between the ordinary folk and the extraordinary, the stars, the celebs? Do we judge what makes us special by our material wealth, our social standing, our academic success, the number of people who recognise us? I am as happy as the next post-80s socialite to be in her glad rags and jewels for a night but I am concerned that with all that money and status and happiness abounding tonight, that homeless person has a lap full of freebie chocolate. Maybe someone will write him a cheque.

Other people will talk about the glitz and the nominees and the winners and the glitterballs of a spectacular night. I want to talk about ordinary people, the social aspects of an awards event and the curious exclusivity of the Welsh Language.

To start again, I am standing in the press pen wishing I had a mallow ice-cream cornet to wave at people like a mike, asking for an interview. I am strangely confused by the lack of enthusiasm of journalists to actually talk to the guests. One old hack prefers to cover news events, another happily interviews in Welsh, armed with his iphone on record. Two reviewers behind me barely talk to each other. Others think that we four from Get the Chance are better turned out than the stars.

Which brings me to another reflection on society today (sic), what happened to Black Tie occasions meaning black tie? This is not about class, this is about respecting the invitation from the organisers, sponsors, guests, nominees and attendees; as well as the public so patiently waiting along the barricades. This is the BAFTA’s after all – a visual feast. The men generally are smart but very few bow ties and a nasty selection of daps on show. So few women sweep the red carpet in elegant attire that the ones I spot, I approach at the party later and tell them how lovely they looked, how professional. Each one crumbles in gratitude and enjoys the compliment. So few walk with confidence, I hesitate to use the word deportment but high heels and tight dresses usually benefit from a fine carriage.. why are all these extraordinary women so lacking in assurance? Perhaps it is their ordinariness revealed.

Everyone is friendly. Perhaps it helps that no one is 100% sure who everyone else is; there is no differentiation between attendees – we are all mucking in together in the audience, in the party, in the bars, taking selfies with the BAFTA masks. This makes for a remarkably easy atmosphere and a great buzz. We are all extraordinary; both inside and outside the building.

But is this exclusive? I am disappointed by the Welshness of it all. I know, it’s the Welsh BAFTA’s, BAFTA Cymru; but this is designed to celebrate the wonderful dramatic work in Wales and share it, not create a club based on linguistics. I was born in Wales, I have some Welsh language and I was educated here in Cardiff. Am I alone in thinking that this thing is not for the likes of me? There are not many people lining those barricades along The Hayes, the lack of press, the scuttling into the Hall, the dressing-down, the determination to celebrate smallness over scale. It feels just a little bit poor, the content just a little bit too fashionable. A fab party but not a BAFTAs, a magnificent glorification of TV and Film, helping to get those important messages out there – it’s OK to have fun, it’s right to tell your story, it’s good to want to change the world.

It feels just a little bit ordinary, whatever that is. We should have more pride and shout it out. It is time for another wafer, monsieur; and I think most of us ordinary folk would also prefer something savoury, something more substantial.

Caveat

Every evening in Cardiff I see more and more homeless people; last night, when leaving the WMC on a cold, foggy night, sitting in a corner against the main building was a man completing a broad sheet newspaper. We interrupted him to give him what cash we had about us – a paltry handful of change as it turned out – but he would not take it without giving us something in return. He gave us a magic trick. We enjoyed a chat and a laugh together and went on our way. I wished I had some warm quiche for him too.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 25th British Academy Cymru Awards by Emily Garside

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British Academy Cymru Awards, Special Award recipient Terry Jones with Michael Palin, © Jonathan Hordle/BAFTA

On Sunday 2nd October 2016 BAFTA Cymru celebrated once again the best of Welsh film and television talent. From documentary makers, to actors, directors and make up and special effects, the spectrum of filmmaking talent in Wales and around the world was celebrated. Thanks to alterations in the eligibility criteria, works by Welsh artists outside of Wales are now eligible, which means from Downton Abbey to Hinterland and everything in between the awards honoured the talented work from and in Wales.

On the red carpet for this year’s awards Host Huw Stevens stopped by to discuss the awards before heading inside to prepare. After a brief chat about the earlier excitement of Cardiff’s Half Marathon (he watched at home in his pants) he was keen to share his excitement for the awards. Emphasising how important it was to showcase Welsh talent in the capitol city, and just how much talent Wales had to show, Stevens also noted that he got ‘the best deal’ because he got to read out a lot of the nominations.

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Ceremony host Huw Stephens arrives on the red carpet.© Jonathan Hordle/BAFTA

As Stevens headed inside to get ready for the show, other guest and nominees began to arrive. The Get the Chance Team got to chat to a lot of the arrivals, and find out just who they were excited to see nominated (and possibly win). Early to arrive were BBC Newsreader husband and wife team Lucy and Rhodri Owen, who talked about the range of real quality drama that they enjoy from Wales including the ever popular Hinterland/Y Gwyll. We also chatted to Torchwood stars Gareth David Lloyd and Eve Myles, there to present awards. Later a fantastic arose opportunity to talk to Yu-Fai Suen, the managing director of Pinewood Studios, who talked enthusiastically about all the talent available in Wales, both in front and behind the camera-and hinted of some big opportunities for the future of filmmaking in Wales!

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Eve Myles signs autographs for fans on the red carpet.© Polly Thomas/BAFTA

There was also chance to catch up with nominees on the Red Carpet, with best actor nominees Aneurin Barnard and Richard Harrington, both talking about the great opportunity to celebrate work done in Wales presented. A longer, more personal chat with Tim Rhys Evans-best known as musical director of Only Men Aloud- talked about the more powerful side of the awards, in raising awareness for issues within the drama and documentaries produced. Rhys-Evans was part of a brave documentary that followed his struggles with mental health, and he talked passionately about both the film’s power as a talking point and opportunity for people to begin to end the stigma around mental illness. He noted in particular, that the chance to talk to press once again about the film having been nominated, was another opportunity to continue talking about mental health, and hope that having used the film to talk about his own experience others would do the same and get help when they need it. And as much as this night was about celebrating the talent of those involved in film, Tim Rhys-Evans’ brave documentary is a reminder that there is also often a broader impact to the work made.

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Tim Rhys Evans collects the Single Documentary Award for Tim Rhys Evans – All in the Mind.© Jonathan Hordle/BAFTA

In watching the awards ceremony, itself, it is clear there is powerful drama and documentary made in Wales, alongside wonderfully entertaining work. Tim Rhys Evans – All in the Mind went on to win two awards, one for Madoc Roberts for editing, and one to the production team for Best Single Documentary. Roberts thanked Tim Rhys Evans and said ‘What a thing to do to help others’ while Rhys Evans in accepting the award with the team commented it seemed odd to receive an award for ‘a particularly shitty time in my life’ but went on to say that as statistically a quarter of the audience tonight would be affected by mental illness, that we should continue to keep talking and end the stigma.

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Lowri Morgan and Ffion Dafis with Rondo Production Team winners of Live Outside Broadcast Award for Cor Cymru: Y Rownd Derfynol.© Polly Thomas/BAFTA

Elsewhere in the factual categories Wales’ musical side was reflected in the factual categories with Les Miserables Y Daith i’r Llwyfan in the Entertainment Programme category and Côr Cymru – y Rownd Derfynol in the Live Outside Broadcast category. And Factual Series was won by Music for Misfits: The Story of Indie given to Siobhan Logue, which she dedicated to ‘All the misfits out there’.

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Lee Haven Jones winner of Director: Fiction for 35 Diwrnod Apollo, Cwmni Boom Cymru. © Polly Thomas/BAFTA

In drama the directing award-a competitive category spanning drama made inside and outside Wales, and featuring an episode of ITV powerhouse Downton Abbey- was picked up by Lee Haven Jones for 35 Diwrnod – Apollo. Deservedly for a masterful piece of drama, and a career that is going from strength to strength, Haven Jones lamented that his Mother was going to kill him for not bringing her for the second time, and dedicated the award to his partner Adam who he ‘Moans with a lot, but also dreams with’ Elsewhere in Drama, best actor winner Mark Lewis Adams for Stanley in Yr Ymadawiad thanked both his co-stars and the hair and makeup team for helping him to create and inhabit his character every day, and dedicated the award to his wife. Meanwhile best actress winner Mali Harris for DI Mared Rhys in Y Gwyll/Hinterland thanked the show for the opportunity to ‘Play cops and bad guys’ for ten months of the year.

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Robert Pugh with Mali Harris winner of Actress Award for Dl Mared Rhys in Y Gwyll/Hinterland – Hinterland Films 2Ltd/Fiction Factory/BBC Wales/S4C. © Polly Thomas/BAFTA

The special awards for this 25th anniversary were particularly poignant. The Sian Phillips award being given, for the first time to a makeup artist, Sian Grigg. And was awarded by the namesake herself, Sian Phillips, who declared the award ‘from one Sian to another’. The special presentation was accompanied by video messages from Ioan Gruffoad and Leonardo DiCaprio, who both worked closely with Grigg over the years. Girgg dedicated her award to her Mother, also a makeup artist, for being her inspiration.

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Sian Phillips with Sian Grigg winner of Sian Phillips award. © Polly Thomas/BAFTA

The Outstanding Contribution to Film and Television award was given to Terry Jones. This celebration was, it’s fair to say, tinged a little by sadness with the news that Jones has been diagnosed with a form of dementia, and is suffering its effects, including a loss of communication skills. Accompanied to the ceremony by friend and fellow Monty Python star Michael Palin-who led the tribute to him-and his son, Terry was still able to come on stage and accept his award. And in true Terry Jones style, despite not being able to communicate through speech, he still conveyed his feelings perfectly, waving down the standing ovation and putting the BAFTA to his face to wear like a mask.

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Bill Jones and Terry JonesTerry Jones, BAFTA Cymru Awards, Ceremony, Cardiff, Wales, UK – 02 Oct 2016. © Jonathan Hordle/BAFTA

Clearly happy to be there, and supported by a dear friend and family it was still an opportunity to celebrate his achievements. Despite this, when his son made a short speech, and struggled to hold back his emotions, it was a difficult and touching moment for everyone. But to see Terry Jones, clearly thrilled to be honoured in his home nation, for all his achievements over the years, was a truly fitting end to the 25th Anniversary BAFTA Cymru celebrations.

The BAFTA Cymru Nominations Party

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All photographs Mission Photographic

I’m so grateful I got an invite,
To attend an evening at the BAFTA Cymru party,
The quality of refreshments had a delicious aroma
The drinks, exhaled a cheerful persona
The nominees as well as the attendees
Were great to speak too, and everyone was a stunner
Dressed to kill, formally dressed to fit the bill
High heels, suits, boots and ties.
The sensation of the champagne, got you mesmerised
The room was filtered with amazing lights
Flashing shots, projected from the HD camera
The photographer, was annoyed by my friend’s eager
To look back on every picture
Connections of different energies, filtered the room.
Networking to get correct links, could have been done, all night long.
Anyone not in a group, could Just tag along
The feeling of togetherness, felt strong
Was great to be in a sensational mode
And be part of the 2016 BAFTA awards.

Tanica King

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With this year’s BAFTA Cymru celebration just over a week away, Thursday 22nd September saw BAFTA Cymru gather nominees, press and other industry guests, to celebrate this year’s nominees and announce a couple of special awards.

Guests at this year’s party included; BAFTA Cymru Nominees Party Guests in attendance included Actress nominees Amanda Mealing, Catherine Ayers and Mali Harries; Actor Mark Lewis Jones; Directors Lee Haven Jones (35 Diwrnod) and Molly Anna Woods (Swansea Sparkle, A Transgender Story); Presenter Will Millard; Sherlock designer Arwel Wyn Jones; Just Jim actor/director/writer Craig Roberts.

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Actress Nominees Mali Harries, Amanda Mealing and Catherine Ayers

Hosted by the Sherman Theatre the party was a chance for fellow nominee to mingle informally and catch up on their work (and no doubt a bit of gossip!). The event itself was relaxed and welcoming and felt like a great way to lead up to next week’s more formal event. The Sherman foyer provided a great venue to allow guests to mingle while giving a great backdrop to the formal announcements. Catering by Spiro’s, including some delicious brownie canapes accompanied drinks provided by Tattinger and Beer provided by Tomos a Lilford, meant that guests were treated extremely well. Nominees were also presented with their gift bags after the party which included an array of Welsh-sourced gifts, including Penderyn Whiskey.

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Actor nominee Mark Lewis Jones with his Nominees Bag

The party also provided an opportunity to announce the two special awards for this year’s BAFTA Cymru, the Sian Phillips Award, and the Outstanding Contribution award.

The first of the special award announcements was the Sian Phillips Award, sponsored by Ken Picton Salons. This year’s award goes to makeup artist Sian Grigg. The Oscar nominated Make Up artist, who has worked on films such as Titanic and The Aviator, as well as last year’s Oscar winning The Revenant, will be the first make-up artist to receive this award. Previous winners of the Sian Phillips award include director Euros Lyn, writer Russell T Davies and actors Michael Sheen, Rhys Ifans and Ruth Jones.

This year’s Special award for Outstanding contribution to film and television (Sponsored by Sony) was announced-in a speech featuring some of his best lines- as going to Terry Jones. The writer, actor and director, of course famed for his part in Monty Python. Born in Colwyn Bay, he went on after worldwide success with Python, to write and direct for film and television, including ‘Ripping Yarns’ with fellow Python Michael Palin, and numerous children’s programmes. Later in his career Jones also followed his passion for history, and wrote and directed many documentaries, many focusing on Medieval History, one of his many passions. Affectionately regarded by fans and colleagues alike, it was a bittersweet announcement as on Friday it was also revealed that Jones has been diagnosed with a form of dementia that affects his ability to communicate. However, as a representative for Jones commented; “Terry is proud and honoured to be recognised in this way and is looking forward to the celebrations.”

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To round off the special nominations, John Rhys-Davies, who couldn’t be in attendance due to filming commitments, had a special video message to nominees which elicited applause from the audience. You can listen to it here (via BAFTA Cymru’s twitter)

https://twitter.com/BAFTACymru/status/779345305644965888

The BAFTA Cymru 2016 awards will be the 25th Anniversary of the awards, and speaking to Rebecca Hardy (Awards Manager for BAFTA Cymru) at the party, it’s set to be a spectacular and fun event. Members of the public can also join in the celebration of Welsh Film and Television talent, with tickets available from the St David’s Hall Website (http://www.stdavidshallcardiff.co.uk/whats-on/british-academy-cymru-awards-2016/). For those who can’t attend, members of the Get the Chance team will be in attendance again, and reporting from the Red Carpet on social media, and here on the website for a full report after the event.

Dr Emily Garside 

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It is a marvellous thing to walk along a red carpet into the Sherman Theatre foyer of an autumn evening.

A darkly turned out group of hopefuls raising glasses of champagne and beer, scoffing canapés and chatting loudly. Little groups buzzing amongst themselves waiting for something to happen. I find the beer stand and learn about the joys of owning a micro brewery with Tomos a Lilford with a half of Gaucho in my hand.

Now, at this point I realise that I do not know anyone here. I am relying on introductions and on commentary from the comperes on the stand.

Terry Jones gets a mention, as does Sian Grigg. Very well-deserved wrth gars. On reflection I would have like to have known more about the other nominees.  I have a lovely time. I meet other critics and share stories. I enjoy delicious snacks professionally served and the beer is very good. I am assured that the Taittinger is good too.

BAFTA Cymru Awards 2nd October, 2016

St. David’s Hall
Cardiff

http://www.stdavidshallcardiff.co.uk/whats-on/british-academy-cymru-awards-2016/

Helen Joy

BAFTA Cymru Awards 2015 by Hannah Goslin

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Gruff Rhys winner of Original Music Set Fire to the Stars

With a carpet as red as the Welsh dragon, the streets of Cardiff opened up to support the glamour and talent that has come out of Wales for the 2015 BAFTA Cymru Awards. Stars that are known among the TV dwellers, some who have reached the realms of Hollywood and even celebrities that fly the flag for this wonderful country were out in their glory in the centre of the capital.

Seeing and getting the chance to speak to the likes of Scott Quinnell, Charlotte Church and Russell T Davies was a joy but also a warm sense of pride was evoked for someone who comes from a Welsh mother but predominately studied and trained in this creative country that is not given enough acknowledgement in the industry.

It is all well and good celebrating the United Kingdom as a whole, but to celebrate Wales specifically is a triumph. Underestimated for its acting, musical and writing talent, we have brought out fantastic shows and films from the BBC, S4C and Pinewood Studios.

This especially comes from conversations I have had  with those I know in other parts of the country. There is an attitude that this event is nothing but a lower version of the larger event – a laughable act to celebrate Wales. But how can this be? Do people so easily forget that majority of our programmes and creative people come from Wales? And that this is only growing.

Due to this underestimation of Welsh talent, the focus I wanted to find from talking with these people was what should young people be doing in Wales to get into the industry? Many move away to find better opportunities, and while I moved myself, I was under no illusion that there were prospects in Wales, but more to experience somewhere else for a short time.

Russell T Davis especially was so interesting to speak to. He recommended that the industry is hard work but just to persevere. Writing, especially, the key is to just keep writing. And while this is specific, it could be said that this is great advice for everyone. Working hard gets you everywhere and within a country that slowly is becoming more recognised for the talent it produces, the industry will become harder than it already is, and hard to break.

Other conversations, mostly with actors gave opinions that Wales is a great place for the young in the industry. With fantastic institutions, the way to train and get involved has changed from the days of leaving and finding the hard work of the big smoke that is London. London and England no longer is the be all and end all of the industry but nor does the advice to work hard and find these institutions means that the industry is a lonely place where you look out for only yourself. It was said that finding a group that supports talent such as drama classes or dance classes can also open avenues. Some fall into the industry from these outlets but ultimately, with Wales being such a small place, these training classes can open avenues which still will rely on hard work.

This patriotic and beautiful celebration gives much food for thought, especially for those like myself who moved away to find herself never far from Wales and returning. London is beautiful, it’s fantastic but it is vast. Sometimes lonely and difficult in this vastness. And while Wales is becoming more and more recognised for fantastic talent and may one day will become as vast as London, the warmth and patriotism of the country at such events shows that the industry does not need to be so wide and for the solo, but can be homely, welcoming and so close-knit as Wales as a whole, in my experience, has always been.

BAFTA Cymru Awards 2015 by Lois Arcari

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Director Euros Lyn and writer Russel T Davies with the Sian Phillips award which was presented to Euros by Russel at the ceremony.

Last Sunday, our dragon roared in celebration of the talents of this country, why I hear you ask?

Last Sunday was the 2015 BAFTA Cymru Awards, a buzzing celebration of Wales’ talent, and blooming attraction to international shows and films, with the public watching amongst home grown stars.

Wisdom –easy to receive, hard to listen to – certainly when your brain has a series of buffers and filters to make the challenge of it getting in there that tad bit more exciting, the cogs and emotions of your brain cheering on the wipe out style spectacle before them. Luckily, wisdom is astronomically better fated straight from the horse’s mouth – when the ‘horse’ is another thing entirely. An institution of a show runner, a brilliant, lauded writer, Russel T Davies. The chestnut in question- “just write” Which of course, I am in the process of doing, somewhat strangely with the same, utterly euphoric glee that came over me, and all spectators during the event.

This buzz, according universally to the winners and hosts of the event, is reflected in the unlimited potential of Wales. This potential has, according to, among others, winning director Euros Lyn always been here, but is now being sought ought internationally, with shows like The Bastard Executioner recognising our well of talent.

Each and every interview, however long or short, showed this talent just as easily as the ceremony and awards themselves, with insight into special effects, saying great effects must be ‘wedded to the story’, Director Clare Sturges with her aim to humanise and to stop victim blaming in ‘Sex Work love and Mr Right’, and that tenacity and ‘keenness’ are the first essential steps to arriving in the industry, ready to work for getting to a standard for events like these – something I, as an aspiring writer, would leap at, both hands waiting, despite dyspraxia producing some (light) trauma in the form of PE flashbacks, ready to catch the chance.

No, not even turning the poor saucer of my coffee cup into a small lake could put a damper on the evening. Though slightly soggy. (I shall not, as my friends know full well, ever be up for a comedy award!)

With meeting a childhood icon, industry greats and new friends in the form of the other critics, the buzz is almost certain to remain whenever the memory is looked at, as fondly and excitedly as the night was lived through.

This is as good an incentive as any to have faith in our TV and film, to support upcoming projects and look again at ones past. Among the winners were Euros Lyn, Clare Sturges, Rhod Gilbert, Mali Harries and Gruff Rhys, with Hinterland, Jack to a King and Set Fire to the Stars some of the luckiest projects on the night.

 

The full list of winners can be found here;

http://www.bafta.org/wales/awards/news/winners-announced-british-academy-cymru-awards-2015.

BAFTA Cymru Awards 2015 by James Briggs

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All of the stars were out in force on Sunday the 27th of September at St David’s Hall, Cardiff to attend the annual BAFTA Cymru awards. With the red carpet out and public awaiting the arrival of Wales’ television and movies biggest stars the atmosphere was electric, with plenty of autographs being signed and pictures being taken.

One highlight of the red carpet for me was being able to meet and interview my idol, Russell T Davies. What a really nice guy, so down to earth and a pleasure to chat with. Disappointingly though, he told us that his hit series Cucumber will not be returning for a second series as it was written purely to be for one series only but there seems to be lots more to come from him.

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The Young Critics meet Russell T Davies

After the excitement of the red carpet, we made our way to the press interview room, where we were lucky enough to meet and interview some of the award winners and presenters. Their excitement at winning a Welsh BAFTA was evident and it was a great experience to interview many famous faces such as Gruff Rhys, the renowned and well deserved winner Euros Lyn and the Production team for Jamie Baulch – Looking for my Birth Mum to name but a few.

It was evident from many of the winners that they appreciated winning a BAFTA Cymru award. You could see that whether they were in front of the camera or in the production teams that it was an amazing achievement and one that they would cherish.   For some, who had started from humble beginnings, were happy to share their stories and by winning an award for their hard work they had achieved one of their ultimate goal by receiving such a prestigious award.   Everyone who attended the awards, be they in front or behind the camera, were all inspirational and really did make you feel that you should chase your dreams and one day you may be lucky enough to be collecting a BAFTA yourself.

So, overall a truly magical evening that allowed fans of Welsh TV and Film to come out and join in with the celebrations of what Wales has achieved. We wait in anticipation and look forward to seeing what the coming year will bring us in the world of Welsh film and television.